Clarius handheld wireless ultrasound scanner CE approved

Clarius announced that it has CE Mark approval for the commercial sale of the C3 and L7 Clarius Wireless Ultrasound Scanners for use by medical professionals.

“Clarius has amazing image quality for such a small device,” said Dr. Gert-Jan Mauritz, an emergency medicine resident and ultrasound instructor based in the Netherlands.  “It’s better than a traditional ultrasound machine because I carry it everywhere in my pocket and it’s so easy to use the Clarius App on my phone.”

Compact ultrasound systems for use at the bedside are the norm in most hospitals and many private clinics. But costs of high quality systems have been a barrier for more widespread adoption. A basic ultrasound scanner from Clarius will start at €6,600 in European Union countries.

Clarius Scanners are powered by a rechargeable battery, which is easily exchanged when running low. Built with a magnesium case, Clarius Scanners are designed to withstand challenging environments and are water submersible for easy cleaning and disinfection.

FDA cleared Second Generation Parkinson’s KinetiGraph

Global Kinetics Corporation has received notification from the US Food and Drug Administration of 510 (k) marketing clearance for its second generation technology – the PKG™-Watch.

Clearance of this technology signals a major milestone for Global Kinetics, underpinning aggressive expansion into new product and service offers to meet the needs of the Parkinson’s community worldwide.

The new technology is a core platform for the company to reach scale in the US, European and Asia Pacific clinical care markets by overcoming previous distribution and data handling constraints. It enables GKC to capitalise on our growing telehealth and clinical trial services businesses, and to build on our already substantial partnerships with global pharmaceutical and device leaders in Parkinson’s.

Developed based on extensive feedback from users of the previous-generation PKG™, the Second Generation PKG™ is smaller, more compact and includes a touch sensitive backlit screen with haptic and visual feedback, a water resistance enclosure and mobile charging and data handling capacity.

Source: Global Kinetics Corporation

Detecting emotions with wireless signals

As many a relationship book can tell you, understanding someone else’s emotions can be a difficult task. Facial expressions aren’t always reliable: A smile can conceal frustration, while a poker face might mask a winning hand.

But what if technology could tell us how someone is really feeling?

Researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have developed “EQ-Radio,” a device that can detect a person’s emotions using wireless signals.

By measuring subtle changes in breathing and heart rhythms, EQ-Radio is 87 percent accurate at detecting if a person is excited, happy, angry or sad — and can do so without on-body sensors.

MIT professor and project lead Dina Katabi envisions the system being used in entertainment, consumer behavior, and health care. Film studios and ad agencies could test viewers’ reactions in real-time, while smart homes could use information about your mood to adjust the heating or suggest that you get some fresh air.

“Our work shows that wireless signals can capture information about human behavior that is not always visible to the naked eye,” says Katabi, who co-wrote a paper on the topic with PhD students Mingmin Zhao and Fadel Adib. “We believe that our results could pave the way for future technologies that could help monitor and diagnose conditions like depression and anxiety.”

EQ-Radio builds on Katabi’s continued efforts to use wireless technology for measuring human behaviors such as breathing and falling. She says that she will incorporate emotion-detection into her spinoff company Emerald, which makes a device that is aimed at detecting and predicting falls among the elderly.

Using wireless signals reflected off people’s bodies, the device measures heartbeats as accurately as an ECG monitor, with a margin of error of approximately 0.3 percent. It then studies the waveforms within each heartbeat to match a person’s behavior to how they previously acted in one of the four emotion-states.

Full Story is available from MIT website.

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iBeat and Dr. Mehmet Oz To Launch Lifesaving Smartwatch

Mehmet Oz, called America’s Doctor by many, has joined with health tech startup iBeat to launch a breakthrough heart monitoring smartwatch that empowers people to live longer lives. The partnership with Dr. Oz will kick off with pre-orders for its iBeat Life Monitor – a watch that continuously monitors one’s heart for life threatening emergencies and notifies loved ones and emergency responders in such an event. A world renowned leader in cardiothoracic surgery, a transplant surgeon, and holder of eight patents, Dr. Oz has saved thousands of lives both in the operating room and by educating his millions of viewers. After seeing the massive impact potential of the iBeat technology in their San Francisco headquarters, Oz invested, partnered with, and joined on as Special Advisor to the company.

“The iBeat Life Monitor was designed to continuously measure and monitor one’s heart and potentially prevent fatal heart incidents,” said Dr. Oz, seven-time Emmy Award winning host of the nationally syndicated “The Dr. Oz Show.” “This medical-grade device not only provides users with a sense of safety and control over their own heart health – which is vital in the treatment and prevention of heart failure – but also allows their loved ones and family members to take a more observant role in their care as well. To make a positive impact on the health of others, I’ve learned that we need to make it easy to do the right thing. This device is not only a technological breakthrough that will be more effective than anything on the market, it fits into a person’s wardrobe with style and ease, making it simple to integrate its lifesaving properties in one’s everyday routine. As Special Advisor, I look forward to raising awareness around preventing life-threatening heart issues and highlighting a device that can truly save lives.”

The iBeat Life Monitor differentiates itself from other wearables on the market by continuously monitoring and analyzing user’s heart activity and instantly detecting the signs of oncoming cardiac arrest (a sudden cessation of heart function). If the device detects a life-threatening heart emergency, it will engage the user and ask if he or she is ‘OK.’ If the user selects ‘No’ or is unresponsive, iBeat will instantly alert the user’s loved ones and emergency responders in real-time, helping ensure immediate care delivery and potentially saving the user’s life.

The iBeat Life Monitor does not need a cell phone, mobile app, Bluetooth connectivity, or Wi-Fi to function. The device is fully cellular, while built-in GPS ensures the user’s loved ones and first response teams know exactly where the user is in an emergency. In such an instance, emergency contacts will get a text with a link showing where the user is and where they are in-transit so they can meet them at the hospital or nearby care center. Users will also have access to an online dashboard where they can see their daily, weekly, and monthly overall heart health (beats per minutes, heart pattern changes, etc.) and compare it to others within their age range. The device is also equipped with an Emergency-On-Demand button which, when long-pressed for two seconds, will allow users to reach out to their emergency contacts, or if needed, 911.

While the watch is primarily targeted at baby-boomers, especially those who live alone, and individuals with existing heart conditions, the device is receiving notable interest from younger adults and millennials who have parents and grandparents that could greatly benefit from the device. iBeat has already raised $1.5 million in funding from private investors and is looking to establish the market for the iBeat Life Monitor through pre-orders, as well as support the tooling and production line needed to bring the device to the masses.

“The early interest we’ve seen in iBeat has been remarkable,” said Ryan Howard, founder and CEO of iBeat. “We are excited to bring our device to the Indiegogo platform to drive even more awareness around the product and its ability to potentially save someone’s life. If you suffer a life-threatening heart incident such as sudden cardiac arrest, you have a 90% chance of dying without intervention. There are many devices on the market including diabetic monitors, heart-rate monitors, and other health monitoring solutions, but all these devices only passively monitor you. None of them actively monitor and analyze your heart health around-the-clock like the iBeat Life Monitor. Continual monitoring and quick intervention can mean the difference between life and death in emergency situations.”

Source: iBeat

Wireless connectivity for implanted devices

University of Washington researchers have introduced a new way of communicating that allows devices such as brain implants, contact lenses, credit cards and smaller wearable electronics to talk to everyday devices such as smartphones and watches.

This new “interscatter communication” works by converting Bluetooth signals into Wi-Fi transmissions over the air. Using only reflections, an interscatter device such as a smart contact lens converts Bluetooth signals from a smartwatch, for example, into Wi-Fi transmissions that can be picked up by a Smartphone.

“Wireless connectivity for implanted devices can transform how we manage chronic diseases,” said co-author Vikram Iyer, a UW electrical engineering doctoral student. “For example, a contact lens could monitor a diabetic’s blood sugar level in tears and send notifications to the phone when the blood sugar level goes down.”

Due to their size and location within the body, these smart contact lenses are too constrained by power demands to send data using conventional wireless transmissions. That means they so far have not been able to send data using Wi-Fi to smartphones and other mobile devices.

Those same requirements also limit emerging technologies such as brain implants that treat Parkinson’s disease, stimulate organs and may one day even reanimate limbs.

Full story can be found from University of Washington website.

 

Roche launches innovative Accu-Chek Guide blood glucose monitoring systemGuide blood glucose monitoring system

Roche launches of the Accu-Chek® Guide, the next-generation blood glucose monitoring system. This new system is designed to make everyday blood glucose (BG) monitoring easier with features such as the spill-resistant SmartPack test strip vial, which helps users to remove just one strip at a time and avoid spillage or contamination. The Accu-Chek Guide system also provides for advanced accuracy, which enables reliable diabetes management. “As the global leader in diabetes management we are dedicated to supporting people with diabetes, in thinking less about their daily therapy routines. We are very excited to introduce this innovative system, that simplifies blood glucose monitoring and improves the testing experience,” said Roland Diggelmann, CEO Roche Diagnostics. First markets to launch the new system are Denmark, Switzerland and Australia. Morecountries will follow subsequently starting in early 2017.

The Accu-Chek Guide system enables on-board pattern detection that helps to increase awareness of too high or too low glucose readings as well as Bluetooth Low Energy connectivity to the Accu-Chek Connect diabetes management solution via a mobile app. This cloud-based solution guarantees a secure online data exchange and automatic data logging. People with diabetes, caregivers, and healthcare providers can share diabetes information virtually anywhere for timely advice and remote monitoring. Such telemedicine solutions can help people with diabetes and their caregivers manage diabetes more efficiently and give them peace of mind and a feeling of relief. Hence, 97% of 197 participants in a recently published study from France and the US agreed that the system was very easy to use and offers a better testing experience.

The Accu-Chek Guide system not only fulfills current accuracy standards but delivers even tighter 10/10 accuracy for more reliable results3. Consistently accurate measurements are essential for reliable BG monitoring and deriving the correct therapy decisions. Large deviations of the measured BG values from the true glucose levels can result in higher HbA1c levels, glycemic excursions and markedly increased rates of hypoglycemic events, as a recently published retrospective study revealed. In addition, studies have demonstrated that only about half of the BG meters evaluated meet the minimum accuracy requirements as defined by the ISO 15197:2013/EN ISO 15197:2015 Standard.

A press release can be found from Roche Website.